While Octavia E. Butler’s Fledgling is Mostly a “Sophisticated” Twilight, One Can At Least Glean That the Vampire/Human Relationship is an Allegory for Slavery

When Fledgling first came out in 2005, it once again put Octavia E. Butler on the map as an author. Capitalizing on the then current zeitgeist of the vampire story (the Twilight series was released on October 5 to Fledgling‘s September 8), Butler’s writing style throughout often smacks of the sentiment, “I need a paycheck.” Its rather on the nose motif of the old guard’s contempt … Continue reading While Octavia E. Butler’s Fledgling is Mostly a “Sophisticated” Twilight, One Can At Least Glean That the Vampire/Human Relationship is an Allegory for Slavery

The NeverEnding Story As Love Letter to the Power of Books

  For anyone who has ever been “swept away” into the narrative of a novel, completely engrossed in its alternate reality, there is no better love letter to the power of books than The NeverEnding Story. Centered on the fringe-existing Bastian (Barret Oliver), a 12-year-old whose mother has recently died, the film’s focus on the ability of books to transport one out of his or … Continue reading The NeverEnding Story As Love Letter to the Power of Books

Zsa Zsa Gabor’s How To Catch A Man, How To Keep A Man, How To Get Rid Of A Man Proves the Once Upon A Time Beauty of Political Incorrectness

There are times when, upon revisiting an old work of literature, the lack of political correctness can make it almost unreadable (e.g. William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew–though it is still immensely watchable in 10 Things I Hate About You form). This is not the case with Zsa Zsa Gabor’s 1970 “guide”/”autobiography,” How To Catch A Man, How To Keep A Man, How To … Continue reading Zsa Zsa Gabor’s How To Catch A Man, How To Keep A Man, How To Get Rid Of A Man Proves the Once Upon A Time Beauty of Political Incorrectness

Trying to “Fill Her Holes,” Melissa Broder Fine-Tunes A Marie Calloway Genre With So Sad Today

Melissa Broder is all about filling her holes. It’s meant to sound less perverse than it does, though one imagines Broder’s sense of humor could appreciate the sexual connotation as well. One can barely get through a ten-page block of her essay collection So Sad Today (named for the Twitter account that inspired it) without the mention of hole filling. And, by whatever means necessary–sex, … Continue reading Trying to “Fill Her Holes,” Melissa Broder Fine-Tunes A Marie Calloway Genre With So Sad Today

Boy Gone Wilde

On October 16th, what marks Oscar Wilde’s 161st birthday, his distinctive approach to art and life remains a force to be reckoned with. Starting from his first forays into writing, which began during his attendance at Trinity College, Wilde expressed a latent sadness through his humor, as with the poem “Hélas,” in which he laments, “To drift with every passion till my soul/Is a stringed … Continue reading Boy Gone Wilde