“When the great terror came/I fell dumb”: Nelly Sachs & the Written Word as the Sole Means for Vaguely Getting Across One’s Internal Turmoil

When it comes to the genre often relegated to “Holocaust writers,” Nelly Sachs frequently seems to be overlooked. Born in Schöneberg at the end of the nineteenth century, Sachs’ poetry very clearly comes from a place of seeing the contrast between prosperity and decay, tranquility and terror. Her privilege of being a part of a wealthy family allowed her the later associated with Emily Dickinson … Continue reading “When the great terror came/I fell dumb”: Nelly Sachs & the Written Word as the Sole Means for Vaguely Getting Across One’s Internal Turmoil

Melissa Broder’s The Pisces: The Fisherman and His Soul It Is Not

At the core of Melissa Broder’s still all too scant body of work (primarily the essay collection, So Sad Today) is a constant obsession with the human need to fill holes. Whether that translates to a woman literally filling her vag hole with as many dicks as possible or, well, no, that’s really Lucy’s–the “protagonist” of The Pisces–only bread and butter, her sole means toward … Continue reading Melissa Broder’s The Pisces: The Fisherman and His Soul It Is Not

Emotional Death Blows in The Tell-Tale Heart

“I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him.” So says the plagued with guilt narrator of Edgar Allan Poe’s classic, “The Tell-Tale Heart.” It is a statement, however, that is not merely applicable to the literal so much as the more abstract, emotional death blow that can be delivered to a person right before you do … Continue reading Emotional Death Blows in The Tell-Tale Heart

Per Orwell’s Warning, Language Continues to be Rendered Meaningless as Evidenced by the Meeting of the “Minds” at the Oval Office

Perhaps even more eerily accurate and increasingly prescient with the passage of time than George Orwell’s 1984 is his essay entitled “Politics and the English Language.” As only Orwell, in all his deftness, could describe the core of the problem of how we wield language, he commences the thesis as follows: Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English … Continue reading Per Orwell’s Warning, Language Continues to be Rendered Meaningless as Evidenced by the Meeting of the “Minds” at the Oval Office

The Oxford English Dictionary “Can’t Help” Its Sexism In Its Latest Additions, There Just Aren’t Enough Female Directors

Though it is often difficult to ascertain precisely what century we’re in at the moment–nineteenth or twenty-first–the one thing that the Oxford English Dictionary can’t be blamed for (entirely) in its recent additions of Altmanesque, Tarantinoesque, Spielbergian, Lynchian and Kubrickian (all of which are, in case you couldn’t tell for yourself, indicative of a sausage party) is that the film industry is the entity at … Continue reading The Oxford English Dictionary “Can’t Help” Its Sexism In Its Latest Additions, There Just Aren’t Enough Female Directors

Riddle Me This: What’s the Meaning of a Kiss? by Marissa Glover

It’s no coincidence that we use our mouth, our lips and tongue, to kiss—the same body parts used in conversation, which is the human’s primary method of communication. The kiss offers a secondary mode of communication, and the messages we can send via a kiss are as vast and varied as the types of kisses that exist. This communicative nature gives the kiss its power, … Continue reading Riddle Me This: What’s the Meaning of a Kiss? by Marissa Glover

Woman World: Now Both Sweet, Realizable Fantasy & Graphic Novel

In the skewed, pea-sized mind of the misogynist, feminism can only mean one thing: the full-fledged radical desire to expunge all men from the earth. In Aminder Dhaliwal’s latest project, a graphic novel called Woman World, this isn’t something they even need to try at as the gradual weaning out of the Y chromosome has taken care of matters all on its own. The jig is … Continue reading Woman World: Now Both Sweet, Realizable Fantasy & Graphic Novel

Quiet Desperation by Loren Miner

“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.” (Ezekiel 36:26, 585 BC) Chief Amongst Sinners If I had five minutes with the most powerful man on the planet: I wouldn’t waste time talking politics or economic policy. I wouldn’t squander a precious second inquiring about … Continue reading Quiet Desperation by Loren Miner

Kate Bush’s Indispensable Role as Literary Guide Through Music

As Kate Bush turns sixty today, it bears reflecting on the milestone with an appreciative bent for all the English chanteuse of a theatrical, baroque persuasion has done to spread the ever diminishing gospel of literature in her music (that’s right, Lana Del Rey wasn’t the first). Perhaps as a direct result of being born in the very country that wrought something as dramatic and … Continue reading Kate Bush’s Indispensable Role as Literary Guide Through Music

J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise: There’s No Better Glimpse Into the Latent Ferality of Humans Than the Modern Concept of Real Estate

Before David Mamet painted the real estate industry as filled with nothing but Dorian Grays in painting form with Glengarry Glen Ross, there was J.G. Ballard to remind us that real estate, not money, is the root of all evil in men. And what better manifestation to iterate that than real estate in its most mutant and classist form: the high-rise? Modern in construction and … Continue reading J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise: There’s No Better Glimpse Into the Latent Ferality of Humans Than the Modern Concept of Real Estate