Quiet Desperation by Loren Miner

“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh.” (Ezekiel 36:26, 585 BC) Chief Amongst Sinners If I had five minutes with the most powerful man on the planet: I wouldn’t waste time talking politics or economic policy. I wouldn’t squander a precious second inquiring about … Continue reading Quiet Desperation by Loren Miner

Kate Bush’s Indispensable Role as Literary Guide Through Music

As Kate Bush turns sixty today, it bears reflecting on the milestone with an appreciative bent for all the English chanteuse of a theatrical, baroque persuasion has done to spread the ever diminishing gospel of literature in her music (that’s right, Lana Del Rey wasn’t the first). Perhaps as a direct result of being born in the very country that wrought something as dramatic and … Continue reading Kate Bush’s Indispensable Role as Literary Guide Through Music

J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise: There’s No Better Glimpse Into the Latent Ferality of Humans Than the Modern Concept of Real Estate

Before David Mamet painted the real estate industry as filled with nothing but Dorian Grays in painting form with Glengarry Glen Ross, there was J.G. Ballard to remind us that real estate, not money, is the root of all evil in men. And what better manifestation to iterate that than real estate in its most mutant and classist form: the high-rise? Modern in construction and … Continue reading J.G. Ballard’s High-Rise: There’s No Better Glimpse Into the Latent Ferality of Humans Than the Modern Concept of Real Estate

Britney Spears Is All We Have to Inspire the Current Landscape of Literature

Because the hubs of literature are often tragically left to the devices of those in Los Angeles and Brooklyn, we, the limited few among the reading public, are primarily saddled with what my ex would probably deem low art (because everything that isn’t Stendhal is low art, right?). It’s not necessarily always a bad thing–except, in retrospect, the work of Chuck Klosterman is pretty banal. … Continue reading Britney Spears Is All We Have to Inspire the Current Landscape of Literature

A Call for Reading Leaving A Doll’s House as a Way to “Honor” Philip Roth’s Death

The death of Philip Roth at eighty-five is symbolic of the continued tearing down of walls that have kept the old guard safe from too much judgment or criticism. The famously perverse Roth, whose perversity found him becoming a legend after the publication of Portnoy’s Complaint in, fittingly, 1969 (also the year Interview was started before it had to end), hadn’t released an incendiary novel … Continue reading A Call for Reading Leaving A Doll’s House as a Way to “Honor” Philip Roth’s Death

The Correlation Between Interview Magazine Closing & New York Being “Over”

Interview Magazine was once the very embodiment of everything New York City itself represented: prescience, rebellion, avant-gardeness, not giving a fuck, being anti-establishment, being ahead of the curve on all things art. Originally started by Andy Warhol at one of the peaks of New York’s artistic renaissances, 1969, the publication was acquired by art collector and billionaire (for don’t you kind of have to be … Continue reading The Correlation Between Interview Magazine Closing & New York Being “Over”

New Journalism Might Have Grown Old, But Tom Wolfe’s Brand Will Remain Forever Young

While Tom Wolfe was not a spring chicken by any stretch of the imagination, the news of his May 14th death served to accent a certain heralding of what they call the end of an era. That era, of course, being the creation and cultivation of New Journalism, and the writers that ascribed to it as freely and unabashedly as Wolfe himself–Joan Didion (above all, … Continue reading New Journalism Might Have Grown Old, But Tom Wolfe’s Brand Will Remain Forever Young

Julio Cortázar’s “Bestiary”: An Allegory for How We All Tiptoe Around Chaos Both Personal & Global

What has always made Julio Cortázar stand out from most writers both of his time and outside of it is the manner in which he applies quotidian details to encompass a larger, more philosophical (and therefore usually more disturbing) meaning. In one of his early short stories, “Bestiary”–published in 1951–Cortázar’s knack for this manner of expression is both subtle and garish. After all, the premise of … Continue reading Julio Cortázar’s “Bestiary”: An Allegory for How We All Tiptoe Around Chaos Both Personal & Global

Beyond Party Lines: Barbara Bush & Literacy

Like Nancy Reagan with her “Just Say No” campaign to tie in conveniently with the War on Drugs platform taken by Ronald (now, in retrospect, more tolerable than Donald) in the 1980s, so too, did fellow Republican First Lady Barbara Bush ultimately carve out her own memorable pulpit, though one slightly more beyond party lines than merely trying to keep people from smoking weed. That … Continue reading Beyond Party Lines: Barbara Bush & Literacy

Why Is Literature Always So Serious In Order to Be Taken Seriously?: On Andrew Sean Greer’s Less Winning the Pulitzer

The most polarizing occurrences tend to happen when stodgy institutions start to get on board–generally well after the zeitgeist has already happened–with a certain “trend” that will make them more palatable to the mainstream, leading those who still “uphold their medium to a certain standard” scratching their heads violently with skepticism. This happened in an egregious fashion with Bob Dylan winning the Nobel Prize, but … Continue reading Why Is Literature Always So Serious In Order to Be Taken Seriously?: On Andrew Sean Greer’s Less Winning the Pulitzer