Lourdes Leon Reading bell hooks Has Some Weighty Implications

Among other casual bombshells in Lourdes Leon’s first Vanity Fair feature, one included, of all things, her reading list. For starters, it wasn’t necessarily imagined she would be “basic” enough to fuck with Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility. For another, bell hooks being name-dropped (specifically 2000’s All About Love: New Visions) seems, in many respects, vaguely traitorous to her own mother, who was the subject of … Continue reading Lourdes Leon Reading bell hooks Has Some Weighty Implications

The Experiences of Ramona Quimby Belong to the Twentieth Century

It seems fitting—poetic, really—that Beverly Cleary’s death should occur as the throes of the pandemic and its effects continue to rage on (despite what the “officials” might try to declare with their attempts at “rosy” depictions; people will say anything to keep the wheels of capitalism turning, after all). For this is the generation of children slated, arguably, to be the most “fucked up”—or at … Continue reading The Experiences of Ramona Quimby Belong to the Twentieth Century

If The Beasts Could Talk, This Is What They Would Say…

Of all Beatrix Potter’s many tales, she often said it was The Tailor of Gloucester that proved to be her favorite. She even wrote it right around Christmastime of 1901, especially for the daughter of her former governess (oh the Brits with their governesses). In 1902, she was circulating the story “privately” to friends and, by 1903, it was off to the presses for the … Continue reading If The Beasts Could Talk, This Is What They Would Say…

The Poignancy of John le Carré “Bidding Adieu” Before He Could Witness Brexit At Full Tilt

John le Carré had, for all intents and purposes, “thrown in the towel” after 1990. This was the year when his (supposed) last George Smiley book, The Secret Pilgrim, came out. It was an apt (presumed) coda for someone of le Carré’s distinctive genre predilection to cease releasing new work about this particular spy. After all, these novels were rooted in the espionage category that … Continue reading The Poignancy of John le Carré “Bidding Adieu” Before He Could Witness Brexit At Full Tilt

Of All The Trailblazing Fashionistas, The Invisible Man Has Been The Most Unexpected

When H.G. Wells published The Invisible Man in 1897, there were major changes afoot. The turning wheels of the Industrial Revolution had impacted the lives of civilization as few technological advancements ever had. With this historical background in mind, Wells’ focus on a scientist gone mad in the pursuit of his quest for “progress” is not out of the realm of possibility. Neither in the … Continue reading Of All The Trailblazing Fashionistas, The Invisible Man Has Been The Most Unexpected

Johnny Depp and Oscar Wilde: “Libel” to Lose Against British Courts

In the wake of Johnny Depp’s recent–and highly rife with embarrassing details–trial and verdict, one can’t help but chart a similar trajectory toward an inevitable downfall that occurred during another famed libel case in Britain: that between Oscar Wilde and the Marquess of Queensberry. Better known as the father of Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde’s clandestine lover. And Alfred Douglas should perhaps be better known as … Continue reading Johnny Depp and Oscar Wilde: “Libel” to Lose Against British Courts

Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

While France prides itself on being a nation of liberté, the unspoken caveat is that one usually needs to be a man to enjoy such liberté. The feelings of “retro-ness” that women in the country have long felt, whether about gender or racial discrimination (see: Virginie Despentes’ recent comment on the discrepancy between those affected by COVID-19), has reached such a fever pitch that they’ve … Continue reading Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

Dangerous Game: The 90s Movie Version of Yates

In 1993, Madonna would manage to have two films released via MGM. The first, Body of Evidence, was unleashed in January–the known “slump” month in the industry, where nothing new ever seems to be released. Unless, that is, it’s something like Body of Evidence, which the studio already expected to fail, hence releasing it during a period where it would have little else to compete … Continue reading Dangerous Game: The 90s Movie Version of Yates

Don’t Talk to Hansel and Gretel About Cottagecore

While Taylor Swift has taken a lot of credit of late for, like, inventing cottagecore with Folklore, others have also reminded that fellow “tastemaker” Marie Antoinette was an original champion of the concept while also only relishing the structure and trappings thereof for their aesthetic value. Not the actual work-related practices behind the upkeep of such a milieu (and why would Taylor or Marie [in … Continue reading Don’t Talk to Hansel and Gretel About Cottagecore

Un Certain Schadenfreude Over Hetero White Male “Writers” Losing Their Coffee Shops As Posts For Self-Aggrandizement

With the bad, one must find the good where they can. The loss of the pseudo-intellectual city dweller’s go-to coffee shop amid the coronavirus outbreak has been an undeniable gut punch to small businesses that somehow seemed to have gotten less of a financial bailout from the government than the major corporations (quelle surprise, for it’s just like when the legal mafia a.k.a. government bailed … Continue reading Un Certain Schadenfreude Over Hetero White Male “Writers” Losing Their Coffee Shops As Posts For Self-Aggrandizement