Glamorama and the Sasha Ultra Violet Mix Edit of “Ray of Light”

Since Madonna seems to be in the mood to throw us back to the 90s (despite cursory “fans” associating her with the 80s), she recently presented the world with a remix (David’s Radio Edit) of 1992’s club hit, “Deeper and Deeper.” But she hasn’t seen fit to stop there via her latest remix single from an upcoming compilation of hits, called Finally Enough Love. That single … Continue reading Glamorama and the Sasha Ultra Violet Mix Edit of “Ray of Light”

It’s Not the Internet, It’s You: Fake Accounts

Being meta is pretty much essential to the twenty-first century “novel.” So is exhibiting signs of “immediate retromania.” In the case of Fake Accounts (a non-risqué double entendre of a title), that means taking us “all the way back” to the Women’s March that transpired on Donald Trump’s inauguration day in 2017. As Lauren Oyler’s debut, Fake Accounts firmly establishes her place in the usual insular “New York … Continue reading It’s Not the Internet, It’s You: Fake Accounts

Raise Your Hand If You’re A Millennial Who Has Ever Felt Personally Victimized by Bret Easton Ellis–And Vaguely Gotten Off On it

One cannot, perhaps, be an average hypersensitive member of what Bret Easton Ellis calls Generation Wuss in order to read his latest book (which he deems intended “for the Bret Easton Ellis completist”–an admittedly waning faction), called, provokingly, White. In case one isn’t familiar, Generation Wuss is a reference to the emotionally reactive millennial, a breed that is, at this juncture, no stranger to having … Continue reading Raise Your Hand If You’re A Millennial Who Has Ever Felt Personally Victimized by Bret Easton Ellis–And Vaguely Gotten Off On it

Sloane Crosley’s The Clasp: Like A Sequel to The Rules of Attraction

While all of Bret Easton Ellis’ novels apart from American Psycho are either unknown or underlooked by the general public, the influence of his other narratives is evident in everything from Tamas Dobozy’s “Field Recordings” (a Lunar Park style of writing oneself into the story) to Zoolander (Glamorama). Thus, it comes as no shock that Sloane Crosley’s third novel and first work of bona fide … Continue reading Sloane Crosley’s The Clasp: Like A Sequel to The Rules of Attraction

American Psycho and the Concept of “Everyone is Everyone”

As one of the most illustrious characters in post-modern literature, Patrick Bateman’s obsession with wealth and wanting to “fit in” is indicative of the meaninglessness of contemporary life and lack of distinguishment when it comes to both people and possessions. Set in 1980s New York, a time period that was one of the pinnacles of excess and disparate wealth, Easton Ellis paints the portrait of a … Continue reading American Psycho and the Concept of “Everyone is Everyone”