Johnny Depp and Oscar Wilde: “Libel” to Lose Against British Courts

In the wake of Johnny Depp’s recent–and highly rife with embarrassing details–trial and verdict, one can’t help but chart a similar trajectory toward an inevitable downfall that occurred during another famed libel case in Britain: that between Oscar Wilde and the Marquess of Queensberry. Better known as the father of Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde’s clandestine lover. And Alfred Douglas should perhaps be better known as … Continue reading Johnny Depp and Oscar Wilde: “Libel” to Lose Against British Courts

Eve Babitz and the Trouble With Taquitos

Even someone as “harmless” and carefreely narcissistic as Eve Babitz might not have made it in today’s literary scene. As her resurgence reached a crescendo in 2018, with Emma Roberts touting Sex and Rage as her book club choice (oy vey) for the summer of ’17 and Counterpoint re-issuing a lesser known work called Black Swans the year after, on the heels of the rediscovered … Continue reading Eve Babitz and the Trouble With Taquitos

We Have Always Lived in the Castle: The Ideal Halloween in Lockdown Read

Because Shirley Jackson never disappoints when it comes to specializing in chilling tales detailing the macabre nature of existence and humanity itself, it is almost impossible to choose a favorite work of hers for the purposes of “celebrating” Halloween. Of course, for many, celebrations of this pagan holiday have been essentially cancelled due to, well, you know. But because this year is so specific with … Continue reading We Have Always Lived in the Castle: The Ideal Halloween in Lockdown Read

Is Poetry More Valuable Than the X-Acto Knife?

Everyone is talking about Louise, now. Maybe they always were, you just weren’t orbiting the right circles, and it’s so hard to be able to nowadays what with there being so few old guard types left with viable apartments of a Woody Allen movie size to allow people in for dinner parties and salons. Blair Waldorf tried to do it once, but you really do … Continue reading Is Poetry More Valuable Than the X-Acto Knife?

The Abandonment of California by Joan Didion: A Comparative Glance at Run River and Where I Was From

In an alternate universe, perhaps Joan Didion herself might have become some version of Lily Knight, the dissatisfied, cuckolding Sacramento girl who couldn’t seem to fathom how to be a good wife to the man who loved her. Without her writing talent as a ticket out of town, Didion could have easily become just another Golden State tragedy, damned to a lifetime of complacence and … Continue reading The Abandonment of California by Joan Didion: A Comparative Glance at Run River and Where I Was From

I’m Thinking of Ending Things Is the Unvarnished Exploration of What It Means to Be Alone, And The Inherent Meaninglessness of Life When You Are

Thinking about it now, there was probably no one else in the world besides Charlie Kaufman who could have adapted Iain Reid’s surreal 2016 novel, I’m Thinking of Ending Things. No one with the same outlook on life or ability to manifest the psychological with such aesthetic deftness. With renewed interest in the source material thanks to the recent release of its film version, it … Continue reading I’m Thinking of Ending Things Is the Unvarnished Exploration of What It Means to Be Alone, And The Inherent Meaninglessness of Life When You Are

Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

While France prides itself on being a nation of liberté, the unspoken caveat is that one usually needs to be a man to enjoy such liberté. The feelings of “retro-ness” that women in the country have long felt, whether about gender or racial discrimination (see: Virginie Despentes’ recent comment on the discrepancy between those affected by COVID-19), has reached such a fever pitch that they’ve … Continue reading Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

Dangerous Game: The 90s Movie Version of Yates

In 1993, Madonna would manage to have two films released via MGM. The first, Body of Evidence, was unleashed in January–the known “slump” month in the industry, where nothing new ever seems to be released. Unless, that is, it’s something like Body of Evidence, which the studio already expected to fail, hence releasing it during a period where it would have little else to compete … Continue reading Dangerous Game: The 90s Movie Version of Yates

The Demise of Q Magazine: Another Death Knell for Music Journalism and Print

There have been few magazines in the annals of modern music history that have been as important as Q. Naturally British (for, despite its smallness, no other country has had as much of an effect on the trajectory of popular music as England–try as Amérique le Freak might to tell itself otherwise), Q was not your average puff piece-filled slop in the vein of J-14. … Continue reading The Demise of Q Magazine: Another Death Knell for Music Journalism and Print

Harry Potter Was Always Pedestrian & J.K. Rowling’s Views Match That

I never fucked with Harry Potter. At least not in the same incredibly overzealous way other people did for most of the 00s. I was a casual peruser after the first book (which didn’t hook me)–just to see what, exactly, all the fuss was about this cultural phenomenon that had managed to get so many otherwise illiterate Americans to read. Clearly, that illiteracy still applied … Continue reading Harry Potter Was Always Pedestrian & J.K. Rowling’s Views Match That