Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

While France prides itself on being a nation of liberté, the unspoken caveat is that one usually needs to be a man to enjoy such liberté. The feelings of “retro-ness” that women in the country have long felt, whether about gender or racial discrimination (see: Virginie Despentes’ recent comment on the discrepancy between those affected by COVID-19), has reached such a fever pitch that they’ve … Continue reading Moi les hommes, je les déteste: A Confluence of Misogyny-Based Censorship in France

Off the Rails: Sylvia Plath’s Mary Ventura and the Ninth Kingdom

Of course it’s no coincidence that Sylvia Plath wrote an allegorical tale about heading to purgatory via train just months before her first suicide attempt at the age of twenty. While Plath’s mother, Aurelia, was brought up Catholic, Plath herself seemed only to flirt with the religion for different, largely erudite reasons throughout her lifetime, using it for the purpose of Mary Ventura and the … Continue reading Off the Rails: Sylvia Plath’s Mary Ventura and the Ninth Kingdom

The Writer & The Characters He Bases Himself On: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

An introduction to Françoise Sagan’s Bonjour Tristesse and A Certain Smile by Rachel Cusk highlights one of the foremost problems a writer must contend with in life: an inability for his or her reader to separate author from character, which ultimately becomes a challenge for the author to do as well. Especially when he or she has cultivated a certain “shtick,” if you will–à la Philip … Continue reading The Writer & The Characters He Bases Himself On: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy