Thank You; No Thank You by Max Talley

Dear Writer, Thank you for entrusting Hooligan Review with your work. Few trust us with anything. We enjoyed this piece thoroughly, but after careful consideration we could not fit it into our current issue. We tried, with smaller fonts, slender margins and even a shoehorn. Damn thing would not squeeze in. Our editors read your story several times, as we often do with work we … Continue reading Thank You; No Thank You by Max Talley

Sloane Crosley’s The Clasp: Like A Sequel to The Rules of Attraction

While all of Bret Easton Ellis’ novels apart from American Psycho are either unknown or underlooked by the general public, the influence of his other narratives is evident in everything from Tamas Dobozy’s “Field Recordings” (a Lunar Park style of writing oneself into the story) to Zoolander (Glamorama). Thus, it comes as no shock that Sloane Crosley’s third novel and first work of bona fide … Continue reading Sloane Crosley’s The Clasp: Like A Sequel to The Rules of Attraction

The Woman of Rome: A Love Letter to the Oldest Profession

Among the many Italian authors billed as literary powerhouses, there is still, perhaps, no one who can hold a candle to Alberto Moravia. His most epic work, The Woman of Rome, is all the proof one needs of this. Released in 1949, the political undertones that become more prominent as the novel progresses cover the then recent past, a wartime era that tore the nation … Continue reading The Woman of Rome: A Love Letter to the Oldest Profession

Collaboration Innovation: Valeria Luiselli’s The Story of My Teeth

Valeria Luiselli is something of the gamine manic pixie dream girl of the literary world–aesthetically at least. When it comes to her prose, though, there is so much more beneath the surface of her marketable look. Her second novel, The Story of My Teeth, published by Coffee House Press (who also put out the English translation of her first novel, Faces in the Crowd, and … Continue reading Collaboration Innovation: Valeria Luiselli’s The Story of My Teeth

Let It Flaubert

As touched on in our first issue, Gustave Flaubert’s genius lie in his ability to paint the most realist of pictures primarily becauseĀ of the surreality of day-to-day living. While Madame Bovary is largely considered the pinnacle of his literary prowess, his entire canon of work offers something of the extraordinary. Flaubert, who grew up in Rouen but found himself in Paris after high school, had … Continue reading Let It Flaubert