The Literary Nods of 10 Things I Hate About You

Long before Olivia (Sydney Sweeney) and Paula (Brittany O’Grady) from The White Lotus were flaunting their book covers, we had Katarina Stratford (Julia Stiles), the “tempestuous” lead character in 10 Things I Hate About You. And, being that the movie was an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, it’s only fitting that there should be plenty of literary nods throughout. Including the fact that Kat herself is … Continue reading The Literary Nods of 10 Things I Hate About You

It’s Not the Internet, It’s You: Fake Accounts

Being meta is pretty much essential to the twenty-first century “novel.” So is exhibiting signs of “immediate retromania.” In the case of Fake Accounts (a non-risqué double entendre of a title), that means taking us “all the way back” to the Women’s March that transpired on Donald Trump’s inauguration day in 2017. As Lauren Oyler’s debut, Fake Accounts firmly establishes her place in the usual insular “New York … Continue reading It’s Not the Internet, It’s You: Fake Accounts

Is It the End or the Beginning of California Literature Now?

East Coastians would likely balk at the term “California literature” as being an oxymoron. And yet, that’s precisely what Joan Didion carved out for herself as a genre. Yes, there were others who had written about California before her—John Steinbeck and Nathanael West come to mind (even Raymond Chandler, for the less hoity-toity)—and all just as negatively through the guise of “poetic darkness.” But none … Continue reading Is It the End or the Beginning of California Literature Now?

“Try to make it sound like you wrote it that way on purpose”: The French Dispatch is a Bittersweet Reminder of the Bygone Era That Fortified Writers Through Literary Magazines

Edgar Wright might be of the belief that the notion of there being “better days” is a fallacy, but that really doesn’t seem to be true when it comes to literary magazines. An enterprise that long ago achieved its heyday, never to really do so again. For it is a decidedly antiquated medium that is difficult to make “sexy” to anyone except pretentious East Coast … Continue reading “Try to make it sound like you wrote it that way on purpose”: The French Dispatch is a Bittersweet Reminder of the Bygone Era That Fortified Writers Through Literary Magazines

Women Posing As Men Posing As Women

As recently as this year, a movie was released with a preproduction backstory that included how the female director considered submitting the script under a male pen name. Lisa Joy, the writer in question of Reminiscence, feared that because of her gender, she wouldn’t be taken seriously in the “action” genre. Naturally, her attempts to “prove herself” as a woman in the male-dominated category failed spectacularly … Continue reading Women Posing As Men Posing As Women

A Pairing by Nathan Leslie

March They sit at their usual table, in their usual spots. They practice habit; habit keeps it together.  Fred orders the black bean soup and the Caesar salad. It is lunch. If it was dinner, he’d order the seafood stew, but it’s always lunch. They only meet for lunch. Marie orders the salmon wrap. She has ordered this before. She likes the squeeze of lemon … Continue reading A Pairing by Nathan Leslie

Eat All the Politicians by D. S. G. Burke

For starters, the organizers miscalculated the general interest among vampires for collectively addressing the avoidable self-annihilation of their preferred food source. The three hundred known nests across the globe sent a total of twenty-eight delegates. The meeting was held in New York, over the long Martin Luther King Jr. weekend. They were unable to secure a room in the United Nations, as initially planned, due to … Continue reading Eat All the Politicians by D. S. G. Burke