When Will You Accept Yourself?: Milk Fed

We don’t choose to exist on this earth any more than we choose who our mother might be. Accordingly, Melissa Broder’s latest, Milk Fed, wields Mother as the crux of Rachel’s daily struggle. Just three years after the release of The Pisces, Broder is building on an oeuvre of highly specialized neuroticism. The kind, they say, is unique to the Semitic mindset. And oh how … Continue reading When Will You Accept Yourself?: Milk Fed

Eve Babitz and the Trouble With Taquitos

Even someone as “harmless” and carefreely narcissistic as Eve Babitz might not have made it in today’s literary scene. As her resurgence reached a crescendo in 2018, with Emma Roberts touting Sex and Rage as her book club choice (oy vey) for the summer of ’17 and Counterpoint re-issuing a lesser known work called Black Swans the year after, on the heels of the rediscovered … Continue reading Eve Babitz and the Trouble With Taquitos

The Abandonment of California by Joan Didion: A Comparative Glance at Run River and Where I Was From

In an alternate universe, perhaps Joan Didion herself might have become some version of Lily Knight, the dissatisfied, cuckolding Sacramento girl who couldn’t seem to fathom how to be a good wife to the man who loved her. Without her writing talent as a ticket out of town, Didion could have easily become just another Golden State tragedy, damned to a lifetime of complacence and … Continue reading The Abandonment of California by Joan Didion: A Comparative Glance at Run River and Where I Was From

Eve Babitz’ Slow Days, Fast Company: A Lighter Version of Play It As It Lays

As the increasing fascination with Los Angeles persists (all the while with New York City becoming less au courant as a place to lust after in terms of inhabitance), it seems appropriate that Eve Babitz would experience a sudden renaissance after many decades spent under the radar. Her obvious counterpart, Joan Didion, is a darker, more brooding version of Babitz (as showcased in Play It … Continue reading Eve Babitz’ Slow Days, Fast Company: A Lighter Version of Play It As It Lays